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MUSC 337: Music in Social Movements

Created for Professor Melinda Russell, Spring 2020

The Basics: Chicago Author/Date Citation Style Examples

There are two versions of Chicago Style: "notes and bibliography" and "author-date" style. The "Notes" style uses footnotes and sometimes a Bibliography, and is typically used in the humanities. "Author-Date" uses in-text parenthetical citations plus a Reference List, and is more typically used in the social sciences.

In the Text

In the paranthetical citation, you will put the author's last name followed by the publication year, comma, page number. For example (Smith 2017, 214).

In the Reference List

Books

Lastname, Firstname. Year. Title. Place of Publication: Publisher.

example:

Jones, A.B. 2014. My Book for Citation. Minneapolis: Good Books Press.

Book chapters

LastName, FirstName. Year. "Title of Chapter." In Title of Book. edited by EditorFirstName EditorLastName, PageNumberSpan. Place: Publisher.

example:

(R) Kelly, John D. 2010. “Seeing Red: Mao Fetishism, Pax Americana, and the Moral Economy of War.” In Anthropology and Global Counterinsurgency, edited by John D. Kelly, Beatrice Jauregui, Sean T. Mitchell, and Jeremy Walton, 67–83. Chicago: University of Chicago Press.

Periodicals (newspapers, journals, magazines)

Lastname, Firstname A., Firstname B. Lastname, and Firstname C. Lastname. Year. "Title of Article." Title of Periodical xx (no. x): pp-pp. 

example:

Smith, Jamie A., Arnold B. Miller, and Jose P. Rodriguez. 2012. "I Love Citation." All About Citation 21 (1): 1-10.

Book Reviews

Ben Ratliff. 2009. Review of The Mystery of Samba: Popular Music and National Identity in Brazil, by Hermano Vianna. Ed. and trans. John Charles Chasteen. Lingua Franca 9: B13–B14.

David Kamp. 2006. “Deconstructing Dinner,” review of The Omnivore’s Dilemma: A Natural History of Four Meals, by Michael Pollan. New York Times. Sunday Book Review, April 23, http://www.nytimes.com/2006/04/23/books/review/23kamp.html.

Informally or Unpublished Reports

Lastname, Firstname. Year. "Title." source type, location. link if available.

example:

Smith, John. 2016. "Apple of the Eye." Senior thesis, Carleton College.

Images and Art

If citing images found in published works or online collections, cite them similarly to book chapters, articles, or web pages within website, with the artist in the author position and the image title in the chapter title, article title, or webpage title position.

If citing images or art that stand alone:

Buonarroti, Michelangelo. 1513-15. The Slav. Marble, 2.09 m. Paris, The Louvre.

Data Sets

Creator. Year. Title. Place: Publisher. link

Example:

The World Bank. 2012. World Development Indicators. Washington, D.C.: The World Bank. http://data.worldbank.org/data-catalog/world-development-indicators.

Video/DVD

Lastname, Firstname. Year. Title. Performed by Firstname Lastname. Place: Studio. Format.

example:

Wong, John. 1999. Cool People at the Libe. Directed by Cat Toff. Northfield: Gould Libe. DVD.

CD or DVD Liner Notes

Pink Floyd. 1970. Notes to Atom Heart Mother. Capitol CDP 7 46381 2, 1990, compact disc.

An Annotated Bibliography

An annotated bibliography is made up of a bibliographic reference followed by a brief description (called an annotation) of the content and importance of the work. The annotation begins one line down from the reference, and it's best to press the Shift key and the Return key together so that it behaves as if the entire thing is one paragraph. (See this example)