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POSC 230: Methods of Political Research

Professor Greg Marfleet - Spring 2020

Keeping Track of Sources

For more advanced research projects (more than 5+ references), you may want to consider a bibliographic management tool.  I'm happy to help you with these.

Data Citation

Citing data helps your readers locate data, replicate your findings, and generally promotes "open data" values. The following should be included in your citation:

  • Author
  • Publication Date
  • Title
  • Publisher or Distributor
  • Version
  • Electronic Location (e.g. URL)

Here is a Chicago Author-Date Style example:

The World Bank. 2012. World Development Indicators. Washington, D.C.: The World Bank (producer and distributor). http://data.worldbank.org/data-catalog/world-development-indicators

Here is Professor Montero's style:

The World Bank. 2012. "World Development Indicators." URL: http://data.worldbank.org/data-catalog/world-development-indicators

(Thanks to IASSIST Data Citation Guide.)

Cite Your Sources

If your syllabus does not specify, ask your professor what citation style you should be using for your papers.

Political Science scholars often use the Chicago Manual of Style (Chicago), American Psychological Association (APA), or American Political Science Association (APSA).

Helpful Guides to Chicago

Online Citation Generators

Guides to Citing Data