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HIST 298: Junior Colloquium

Professor Adeeb Khalid - Fall 2020

What is an historical monograph?

  • A scholarly work
  • That is secondary scholarship
  • On a single topic
  • That is book-length, and not article or chapter length

Etymology for the nerds in the room: from mono- "single" + -graph "something written." 

These ARE monographs

  • Scholarly work?
    • Yes - It's published by the University of North Carolina Press by a professor emerita at Wayne State University.
  • Secondary scholarship?
    • Yes - it's not a reference book, and while there are reproductions of photographs (primary sources for this work) they are supporting documents.
  • Single topic?
    • Yes - it's not an edited work, and the entire work has a single argument.
  • Book, and not journal article?
    • Yes - it's a full book length work.
  • Scholarly work?
    • Yes - It's published by the Cornell University Press by two history professors. The Catalyst record mentions that there's a bibliography and an index. (Note: monographs are often written by a single author, but that is not a requirement)
  • Secondary scholarship?
    • Yes - It's not a collection of primary sources, and it's not a reference source.
  • Single topic?
    • Unclear from the Catalyst record alone, so I consulted a book review for more information. After reading that, it looks like it is indeed a single topic work.
      • "The book satisfies all expectations of a standard history...". From: ​Trachtenbert, Alan. "Reviews of Books -- The Park and the People: A History of Central Park by Roy Rosenzweig and Elizabeth Blackmar." The American Historical Review 98, no. 5 (1993): 1671. https://www.jstor.org/stable/2167209
  • Book, and not journal article?
    • Yes - it's a full book length work.

These are NOT monographs

  • Scholarly work? 
    • Yes - It's published by Oxford University Press by two professors.
  • Secondary scholarship?
    • No - A Handbook is a type of reference material (tertiary scholarship).
  • Single topic?
    • No - It's an edited volume. Each section has a different author.
  • Book, and not journal article?
    • Yes - The entire edited volume is a book length work. However, since it's on multiple topics, most people will just be citing a single chapter (i.e not a book length work).
  • Scholarly work? 
    • Yes/No - This collection is published by Princeton University Press (scholarly). However the original primary source material that is being published did not go through any scholarly peer review process.
  • Secondary scholarship?
    • No - While there is an introduction written by the editor, this is primarily a collection of primary sources.
  • Single topic?
    • No - since the collection of primary sources, each item is about a different topic. The collection is artificially unified around the author (Nixon) by the editor (Perlstein).
  • Book, and not journal article?
    • Yes/No - The entire edited volume is a book length work. However, there are two creators listed: Richard Nixon (author of the primary sources), and the person who edited the volume after the fact. As such, most people will want to cite an individual source, and not the collection writ large.