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COVID-19 Update: Although the Gould Library building remains closed, the library staff continue our commitment to support the teaching and research needs of the Carleton community. Information on remote access to library resources and services will be updated regularly on the Remote Resources and Guidance for Library Users page and this FAQ. Please do not hesitate to contact us if you need additional assistance.

American Studies

Remote Access

Many resources are available remotely!

    1) Our digital sources are available to you from off campus. Off campus access instructions are available here.

    2) If you sign in to HathiTrust, about half of the records for physical books that we have here at the Gould Library will be available for "Temporary Access." Step by step instructions are available here.

    3) If you sign in to Catalyst you will see a "Request For Digitization" link. This will lead you to an Interlibrary Loan form, which is how we're collecting and tracking digitization requests. Be aware that this may take some time and we cannot guarantee a timeline.

    4) You may submit Interlibrary Loan requests for articles and book sections, though please be aware that there may be significant delays. We cannot request physical items (full books etc) through ILL at this time.

    5) You may always contact me for help determining whether sources are available remotely or to help you identify sources that are available that may fit your needs.

Find Books & Articles

Catalyst

For resources from Carleton and St. Olaf

Advanced Search | Help

WorldCat

Books and more from other libraries.

Request books you find on WorldCat using
the "Request Via Illiad" links

Advanced Search tip:

To search for books by someone, use the Advanced Search and do an AUTHOR search. To search for books about someone, use that person's name (last name first) as a SUBJECT.

The best disciplinary databases for Americanists...

Key Reference Sources

Reference sources are efficient ways to get started with most research questions. They give you an overview of your topic and give you lots and lots of clues about how to move forward with your research.

Look for:

  • Key names and vocabulary associated with your topics
  • Related topics
  • Bibliographies or "further reading
  • Any sense of what is known vs what is controversial.
Search using just a few important words at a time for best results.

Search through hundreds of subject encyclopedias at once.

Finding Dissertations

While not considered formally published, dissertations can provide a lot of really useful information. They are especially useful as pointing tools, since their literature reviews and bibliographies are usually very rich sources of information.

I also list them separately here because the FindIt button doesn't work well to link you to the full text of dissertations, so if you come across one in a research database it's best to bring the citation information directly to one of these specialized collections of dissertations in order to find the full text.

The 1691 Project (New York Times)

The 1619 Project is an initiative from The New York Times observing the 400th anniversary of the beginning of American slavery. It was originally published as an interactive website and an August 18th special issue of the New York Times Magazine.